Partisan bickering, congressional gridlock… sometimes

by J.A. Myerson

I made a point on RT America last night that I think bears repeating.

When the countries of Europe get together to try and rescue their sovereign budgets from the vice-like grip of international finance, there is bickering and gridlock, and the people suffer. When American politicians try to create solutions to the health care crisis, there is bickering and gridlock, and the people suffer. When world leaders meet to figure out a response to the climate crisis, there is bickering and gridlock, and the people suffer. There is frequently bickering and gridlock when people would benefit from passage.

But when it comes to bailing out banks, there is never bickering and gridlock — 74 Senators voted for TARP — and the people suffer. When it comes to handing crucial civil liberties over to unaccountable, arbitrary executive discretion, there is never bickering and gridlock — 86 Senators voted for the NDAA — and the people suffer. There is seldom bickering and gridlock when people would suffer from passage.

Let’s drop this myth that there is partisan bickering and congressional gridlock. Instead let’s be honest: the powers that be hold the people in contempt. I say it’s a good thing we’ve begun to respond in kind.

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